New Orleans Teen Accepted Into 115 Colleges, Offered $4 Million In Scholarships Without Parents Trying to Bribe Their way In

(TIML NEWS) Too Much Sauce for A New Orleans teenager has a big decision to make as she prepares to attend college this fall. Antoinette Love, a student at International High School of New Orleans, was accepted into 115 colleges around the country, and offered nearly $4 million in scholarships. FYI Her Parents did not bribe her way into College like some famous people do out here.

Love, the eldest of five children, will be the first in her family to attend college, but she has yet to choose a school.  The teen received a total of $3,775,230 in scholarships, which happens to be more than any other college-bound student in the country this year.

“I started applying in September, and just kept applying and applying until my tiny mailbox at home was suddenly overflowing with letter after letter and dozens of scholarship offers,” Love told WDSU Channel 6 News.

Love’s record number of acceptance letters bested that of a fellow IHSNO student who was accepted into 91 colleges last year, and offered $2.8 million in scholarships.

Her parents, Yolanda and Anthony Love, hope that she picks a college close to home.

Love has been beating the odds, and making her parents proud, since birth. Yolanda and Anthony were only 15  and 17, and understandably “nervous” about becoming parents, when Love was born six weeks prematurely and weighing only 4.4 pounds. As a toddler, Love survived being “viciously attacked” by a dog, her mother said.

These days, Love spends her free time helping to take care of her younger siblings, which includes a 15-year-old brother who has cystic fibrosis.

Love advises fellow high school seniors to apply to as many schools as possible. “This really is a dream come true,” Love said. “All my hours of studying, writing and classes have paid off in the best possible way and I can’t wait to move forward and start my college education.”

See more on her remarkable story in the video below.

 

Advertisements