Camp Lo’s ‘Uptown Saturday Night:’ A Look Back At an Unsung 90s Classic

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(TIML NEWS) In 1997, hip-hop was enjoying a unprecedented boom. For the better part of a decade, the genre had had been growing creatively and expanding commercially. New York rap had been enjoying four year post-G-Funk resurgence that had been highlighted by acclaimed debuts from iconic acts like Wu-Tang Clan, the Notorious B.I.G., Nas, and Jay Z, as well as landmark releases from Redman, A Tribe Called Quest and Mobb Deep, among others. 1997 opened with New York’s dominance firmly re-established.

Rappers Sonny Cheeba and Geechi Suede hailed from the mean streets of The Bronx, and were originally separate entities. Producer Ski Beatz introduced the two; soon thereafter, Geechi Suede, who had already been working under the tutelage of Ski, would begin to bounce ideas off of Sonny Cheeba, who was attending school in Virginia at the time.

Deciding to join forces on a whim, the duo recorded a Ski-produced demo called “What’s The Word, Baby.” Ski was impressed with the group’s potential, but wasn’t fully sold. Not to be deterred, Geechi Suede and Sonny Cheeba went back to the drawing board and would emerge with an eight-song demo that would be shopped to various record labels. The pair was originally known as the Lost Boys, until Dame Dash convinced them to consider a name change.

We had “C-Lo” first, and we found out there was a Cee-Lo Green, so we can’t really rock that,” Sonny Cheeba recalled in an interview with bboysounds. “So we kept the ‘C’. We used to roll c-lo for push-ups while we were waiting on Ski outside the studio.”The “Lo” means you’re probably not gonna hear nobody else with these flows, you’re probably not gonna hear nobody rocking’ what we dress in, and you’re probably not gonna hear too many cats rocking’ over the music we decide to rock over. That’s the ‘Lo’ part of it.” Take a listen to some Classic Hip hop by Some good friends of ours “Camp Lo’

 

 

 

 

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